CAE writing style guide: proposal

Posted by on Mar 12, 2013 in CAE style guides |

Part 3 of 5, you can find the other style guides by clicking here: CAE writing style guides. This is a short summary of some style points to keep in mind when attempting the tasks in the Cambridge English: Advanced writing section. Proposal Who is the audience? The audience for this question is usually your boss, a professional group or a school administrator. What is the purpose of the writing? You are suggesting a solution to a problem.  You need to support your suggestion with factual information and be persuasive. Is it formal? Yes. Should I use headings or bullet points? Yes.  Your target audience wants to quickly find the information they need in order to make their decision. How should it start? Use a very simple title (Proposal for _____).  The first section should describe the problem and the possible solutions. How should it finish? Make your...

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CAE writing style guide: letter

Posted by on Mar 12, 2013 in CAE style guides |

Part 2 of 5, you can find the other style guides by clicking here: CAE writing style guides. This is a short summary of some style points to keep in mind when attempting the tasks in the Cambridge English: Advanced writing section. Letter Who is the audience? This will be given in the prompt. What is the purpose of the writing? You are usually giving information or requesting action.  You should be direct and get to the point quickly. Is it formal? This depends on the audience. Should I use headings or bullet points? No. How should it start? “Dear Sir or Madam (if no name is given), I am writing to…”  This is the expected opening of a letter.  First you explain why you are writing, in the next paragraph you explain why you think you should get what you want. How should it finish? You should clearly re-state your recommendation or desired action in your last paragraph.  This is usually followed by a “I am looking forward to…” statement and “Yours faithfully/Yours sincerely,...

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CAE writing style guide: essay

Posted by on Mar 12, 2013 in CAE style guides |

Part 1 of 5, you can find the other style guides by clicking here: CAE writing style guides. This is a short summary of some style points to keep in mind when attempting the tasks in the Cambridge English: Advanced writing section. Essay Who is the audience? The audience is a teacher or professor. What is the purpose of the writing? You need to develop an argument or opinion.  Usually this is done in 5 paragraphs: introduction, reason 1 (with examples), reason 2 (with examples), addressing counter-arguments (with examples), conclusion. Is it formal? Yes. Should I use headings or bullet points? No. How should it start? It’s important to provide a kind of framework for the reader in your opening paragraph.  If you have been asked to give your opinion on something, you should state what your opinion is (or give a hint) at the beginning.  This shows that you have a clear goal in mind and a desired outcome for the reader (to be convinced by your arguments).  Without this, you give the impression that you have just thought about things, and written some things, and you managed to convince yourself at the end.  That is appropriate for a blog or journal entry, but not for an essay for your teacher. How should it finish? You need to clearly state your opinion in your...

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Natural English explained at UsingEnglish.com

Posted by on Mar 11, 2013 in Grammar, Learning Websites, Vocabulary |

Using English is particularly useful for its phrasal verb dictionary, idioms dictionary and ask a teacher forum.  They have quizzes about phrasal verbs and if you have any questions they have special forums for phrasal verbs and idioms.  If you’ve heard an expression in a film or read something in a book that you just can’t understand, ask the helpful people at Using English.  I post there sometimes,...

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Advanced writing techniques for American university students

Posted by on Mar 11, 2013 in Grammar, Writing |

The Guide to Grammar and Writing is a resource for American college students so the language on the site is considerably more advanced than on a site for English learners.  However, the information is extensive and you may find the pages on punctuation (under Word and Sentence Level) and sentence combining skills (under Paragraph Level) particularly...

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